World History

From the dawn of civilization to the modern dilemmas of nation building in Africa and the Middle East, WORLD HISTORY takes a fascinating look at the common challenges and experiences that unite the human past and inform the future. Authors William J. Duiker and Jackson J. Spielvogel’s best-selling text uses colorful visuals, maps, and dramatic

From the dawn of civilization to the modern dilemmas of nation building in Africa and the Middle East, WORLD HISTORY takes a fascinating look at the common challenges and experiences that unite the human past and inform the future. Authors William J. Duiker and Jackson J. Spielvogel’s best-selling text uses colorful visuals, maps, and dramatic first-hand historical accounts to give readers a powerful perspective on the human experience over time. The easy-to-read narrative is organized around seven major themes (Science and Technology; Arts and Ideas; Family and Society; Politics and Government; Earth and the Environment; Religion and Philosophy; and, Interaction and Exchange), important to all cultures from all time periods, to help readers understand the course of world history and make connections across chapters.

Product Features

  • Seven central themes make the narrative more cohesive while helping students make connections and comparisons across chapters. These themes are: Science and Technology; Arts and Ideas; Family and Society; Politics and Government; Earth and the Environment; Religion and Philosophy; and, Interaction and Exchange. Comparative Essays, Comparative Illustrations, and Documents are each keyed to one of these themes.
  • The book contains over 150 four-color maps and 400 pieces of artwork throughout. Between one and four “spot maps” appear in each chapter, providing critical details on smaller areas not apparent in the larger maps. Map captions encourage readers to think beyond the mere appearance of each map and to make connections across chapters, regions, and concepts.
  • “Film & History” features analyze popular films using a historian’s perspective to show students how movies represent, and sometimes misrepresent, the past. These features shine the spotlight on films such as: The Message (1976), The Adventures of Marco Polo (1938) and Marco Polo (2007), The Lion in Winter (1968), The Mission (1986), Khartoum (1966), and Gandhi (1982). New to this edition are Persepolis (2007), Gladiator (2000), Marie Antoinette (2006), and The Young Victoria (2009).
  • “Opposing Viewpoints” features present two or more primary source documents representing differing perspectives on the same or related topics. These features provide students an opportunity for hands-on analysis. The accompanying critical-thinking questions can be assigned for individual or collaborative study. These features include “Akhenaten’s Hymn to Aten and Psalm 104 of the Hebrew Bible” (Chapter 1), “The Siege of Jerusalem: Christian and Muslim Perspectives” (Chapter 7), “Action or Inaction: An Ideological Dispute in Medieval China” (Chapter 10), “Response to Revolution: Two Perspectives” (Chapter 19),”Advice to Women: Two Views” (Chapter 20), “Three Voices of Peacemaking” (Chapter 23), “Peaceful Existence or Peoples’ War?” (Chapter 26), and “Africa: Dark Continent or Radiant Land?” (Chapter 29).
  • Comparative Essays such as “History and the Environment,” “Trade and Civilization,” “Cities in the Medieval World,” “The Rise of Nationalism,” “Paths to Modernization,” and “One World, One Environment” highlight similarities and differences between and among cultures, while Comparative Illustrations (with critical-thinking questions) enable students to see cross-cultural comparisons of rituals, art, war and other topics. Examples include “The Afterlife and Prized Possessions,” in Chapter 3, “The Stele,” in Chapter 8, “The Taj Mahal: Symbol of the Exotic East,” in Chapter 16, and “The Bombing of Civilians: East and West” in Chapter 25. These essays and illustrations are specifically keyed to one of the seven themes, helping students further identify connections.